Session Descriptions 

DAY 1 Session Descriptions

 

8:30am- 9:30am

Opening Keynote - Dr. Fumiko Hoeft**

The Science of Dyslexia

Description: Learn about the latest neuroscience regarding dyslexia, including every day questions and practical answers. Many important questions will be addressed, including the latest thinking on causes of dyslexia and the brain, the early signs of dyslexia in the brain before learning to read, the role of resilience, the importance of paying attention to socio-emotional and cognitive aspects of each child, and how the brain changes with successful interventions.** 

 

9:40am- 10:55am

Breakout 1 - Dr. Fumiko Hoeft

The Importance of Socio-Emotional Competencies in Individuals with LD/Dyslexia

In this session, Hoeft will introduce a resilience model that unifies not only socio-emotional factors but also cognitive factors that promote success in individuals with dyslexia. She will start the session by introducing the socio-emotional struggles that individuals with LD and dyslexia often face. She will then talk about the neuroscience behind cognitive and socio-emotional resilience and strategies we can incorporate in everyday life to promote resilience. Learning differences and dyslexia are used as examples but much of this information is broadly applicable to all individuals. This model affords a framework for understanding success in children and generates testable hypotheses for future research. 

 

Breakout 2 - Dr. David Hurford** 

Strategies for Screening and Evaluating Dyslexia and Reading Difficulties

The inability to read competently impacts students academically, but also seriously affects them psychologically and emotionally. In fact, many students suffer from anxiety that then leads to depression and suicidal ideation. Students with dyslexia experience an enormous amount of stress and discomfort that leads to many adolescent individuals with dyslexia to consider or to commit suicide (McBride & Siegel, 1997). In addition, Fuller-Thompson and Hooper (2014) discovered that 35% of children with dyslexia had been physically abused by their parents compared to 7% of students without dyslexia. Students with dyslexia also face enormous stress and feel that their teachers do not understand them. These issues can be rectified as a function of gaining knowledge concerning the Science of Reading and dyslexia that then leads to action. Appropriate identification is of utmost importance.**

This session will provide information regarding the nature of dyslexia and its identification which will include how dyslexia should be assessed, assessment tools and ADHD, which should also be assessed before a complete understanding of the reading difficulty can be gained.**

 

Breakout 3 - Eric Price & AdreAnn Paul

Instructional Practices for Struggling Readers at the Middle School Level

This session will cover all the bases for addressing reading difficulties for students at the middle school level. Eric and AdreAnn will discuss things to consider when selecting a curriculum, how to build and implement an effective MTSS system for reading, how to implement assistive technology school wide, and effective practices to help with some of the mental health issues these students encounter. 

 

Breakout 4 - Linda Farrell

Preventing Struggling Readers in Kindergarten and Grade One

In our work with school districts around the country, we are finding that the curriculum in many Kindergarten classes is not preparing all students for success in learning to read. Some students arrive in Kindergarten with fewer skills in place than the curriculum expects. Other students are not able to move at the pace of the curriculum. And some students are simply overwhelmed by the presentation of too much information at one time. To keep these students from becoming struggling readers in Kindergarten and Grade One, teachers need to clearly understand pre-reading skills that are necessary to be prepared to read, know which skills are weak or missing for students getting ready to learn to read, and have effective teaching strategies. In this session, we will present a comprehensive map of pre-reading skills that must be mastered prior to phonics instruction. The map presents a logical sequence of instruction, and it guides teachers to break skills instruction into manageable pieces. The session will include practicing some key strategies for instruction of these skills. We will provide a complimentary informal diagnostic assessment teachers can use to determine if a student has mastered the needed pre-reading skills to become a successful reader. The assessment also targets skills a student still needs to master to be ready to learn to read.

Parent Track Session1

Donell Pons

Dyslexia 101 for Parents 

Learn the basics regarding dyslexia and the science of reading in order to make more informed decisions about your student’s intervention and appropriate accommodations. 

 

11:05am -12:20pm

Breakout 5 - David Hurford (Repeat of breakout 2)

Strategies for Screening and Evaluating Dyslexia and Reading Difficulties

The inability to read competently impacts students academically, but also seriously affects them psychologically and emotionally. In fact, many students suffer from anxiety that then leads to depression and suicidal ideation. Students with dyslexia experience an enormous amount of stress and discomfort that lead many adolescent individuals with dyslexia to consider or to commit suicide (McBride & Siegel, 1997). In addition, Fuller-Thompson and Hooper (2014) discovered that 35% of children with dyslexia had been physically abused by their parents compared to 7% of students without dyslexia. Students with dyslexia also face enormous stress and feel that their teachers do not understand them. These issues can be rectified as a function of gaining knowledge concerning the Science of Reading and dyslexia that then leads to action. Appropriate identification is of utmost importance.

This session will provide information regarding the nature of dyslexia and its identification which will include how dyslexia should be assessed, assessment tools and ADHD, which should also be assessed before a complete understanding of the reading difficulty can be gained.

 

Breakout 6 - Linda Farrell**

A New Phonics Based Method for Teaching High Frequency Words

High frequency words are traditionally taught separately from phonics. They are introduced to students in the order of their frequency, or sometimes grouped by subject (colors, numbers, etc.). While this approach may work for many students, struggling readers often have difficulty reading and spelling high frequency words such as of, want, were, etc. In this session participants learn to organize and teach the words in any high frequency list (Dolch, Fry, etc.) using a phonics-based instructional sequence. They also learn techniques for teaching students to read and spell the 50 or so high frequency words that don’t fit into phonics instruction because of their irregular spellings. Participants leave with new ways to help students with common confusions such as where/were and was/saw. Teachers who have used this approach say that all students, not just struggling readers, read and spell high frequency words with much higher accuracy than using the traditional approach.**

 

Breakout 7 - Ellen Bailey & Ashley Lennox

No More Tears Between Tiers 

You will gain techniques to effectively communicate between environments to positively impact student outcomes. Collaboration between teachers supports students by creating environments that are consistent, goal driven, and equitable. You will be provided with a tool to increase communication between tiers and identify students immediate needs.

 

Breakout 8 - Dr. Fumiko Hoeft

The Science of Early Identification & Intervention 

In this talk, Dr. Hoeft will discuss the importance of early identification and (preventive) intervention for those at-risk for dyslexia and their current trends. She will include relevant work in educational as well as neuroscience research, and discuss currently available edtech tools that assess literacy and related abilities. She will also present ongoing work on the development and validation of a school readiness and dyslexia screener app by experts at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Dyslexia Center, University of Connecticut (UConn) Psychological Sciences and Education, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Cognitive Sciences, Curious Learning (a non-profit based in MA) as well as other organizations. This tablet-based gamified app (AppRISE: Application for Readiness In Schools and Learning Evaluation) is aimed to assess over a dozen domains of cognition, language and literacy skills in preschool to elementary grade children and in small groups or individually. The goal is to help parents, teachers and pediatricians gain a better understanding of their children. The app is being tested in public schools and will be deployed at the state level in California this fall as well as in many other states across the nation. She will discuss current validation results and experience gained through the process, and future directions such as efforts to provide evidence-based resources as well as training opportunities.

 

Parent Track Session 2 - Lindsey Kemeny

Depression, Dyslexia and How You Can Help

Unfortunately, depression and dyslexia often go hand in hand.  As parents, we often feel frustrated and lost when it comes to helping our children. This session will focus on specific ideas to help your child cope with feelings of inadequacy and hopelessness.  Learn techniques to spark positive thinking as well as ways to make your school experience a constructive one.
 

Lunch Keynote**

Brad Barton

Beyond Illusions

How does a dyslexic special education student from a struggling family go on to graduate with honors from university? Having an educator who believed in Brad did not make his journey easy. It did make it possible. Enjoy this magical, instructive and inspiring experience as Brad shares his journey from high risk youth to academic, athletic and professional success.**

 

2:15pm- 3:30pm

Breakout 9 - Fumiko Hoeft (repeat session 1)

The importance of socio-emotional competencies in individuals with LD/dyslexia

In this session, Hoeft will introduce a resilience model that unifies not only socio-emotional factors but also cognitive factors that promote success in individuals with dyslexia. She will start the session by introducing the socio-emotional struggles that individuals with LD and dyslexia often face. She will then talk about the neuroscience behind cognitive and socio-emotional resilience and strategies we can incorporate in everyday life to promote resilience. Learning differences and dyslexia are used as examples but much of this information is broadly applicable to all individuals. This model affords a framework for understanding success in children and generates testable hypotheses for future research. 

 

Breakout 10 - Dr. David Hurford

Opaque Orthographic Structure and its Contribution to Reading Failure

Learning to read is one of the most important and complex behaviors in which humans engage. In our culture, success is dependent upon reading skills. Unfortunately, nearly 20% of our nation’s children have serious difficulties learning to read. Additionally, 33% of fourth-grade students are performing below the Basic Level in reading and 58% are performing below the Proficient Level. Critics argue that ineffective classroom instruction regarding reading acquisition has been partially responsible. This is particularly the case for the English Writing System which has a relatively opaque orthographic structure. Individuals who have dyslexia find opaque orthographic structure to be quite challenging as these writing systems represent phonemes with a variety of alternative spellings. In contrast, transparent writing systems are much less challenging as they represent phonemes with a one-to-one relationship between their graphemes and phonemes; one letter only ever represents one sound and each sound is only ever represented by one letter.

This session will provide information concerning the nature of dyslexia, transparent and opaque writing systems and the contribution of the English Writing System to dyslexia and reading failure.

 

Breakout 11- Donell Pons, Ellen Bailey, Jenn Price

Utah State Dyslexia Handbook Overview and Q&A with Task Force

Join members of the Utah State Dyslexia Task Force to discuss the recently released Utah State Dyslexia Handbook. The panel will address key points and commonly asked questions. There will be time for Q&A during the second half of the session. Task force members on this panel represent USBE, the ACCESS committee, Decoding Dyslexia Utah, and Public school teachers and admin.

 

Breakout 12 - Dr. Jennifer Throndsen & Sara Wiebke**

What's Working in Utah Schools/Interventions for Reading Difficulties Pilot Program

Attendees will learn about the Interventions for Reading Difficulties Grant Pilot Program and the related outcomes. Specific interventions and their levels of success will be shared. Additionally, tools for evaluating or finding interventions to support quality curriculum will be shared.**

,

Parent Track Session 3 - Karee Atkinson

Advocating for your child without losing your cool or your mind!   

Learn how to advocate for your child in a positive way while defending your child’s rights and impacting reading success at the school and district level.

 

DAY 2 SCHEDULE

 

8:30am-9:25 am

Day 2 Opening Keynote - Linda Farrell**

The Difference Between Balanced Literacy and Systematic Literacy Instruction and Why It Matters

Understanding the difference between Balanced Literacy and Explicit, Systematic Early Reading Instruction; is valuable knowledge for teachers and administrators. After attending this session, participants will confidently know the attributes of the most effective approaches to early reading instruction. Additionally, they will be able to evaluate whether the methods being used in their schools and classrooms qualify as most effective, based on current research. — Balanced Literacy is the stated methodology of many early reading instructional programs and of almost all early reading courses taught in colleges of education. Proponents of Balanced Literacy state that Balanced Literacy includes phonics instruction and is research-based, though they acknowledge that this instructional approach is difficult to define. The National Reading Panel's meta-analysis and a number of other research studies conclude that explicit, systematic phonics instruction yields the strongest results, especially for low SES students and students with learning disabilities. This session describes exactly what Balanced Literacy and Explicit, Systematic Early Reading Instruction are, including how they differ, with examples from reading programs using each method. The session also includes a brief review of the research associated with each of the instructional methods.**

 

9:35am- 10:45am

Breakout 13 - Nancy Coffman

Spelling: Who knew there were rules?!

This interactive presentation will guide participants in discovering and practicing the rules for spelling base words. Predictable patterns of our language will be explored in a multisensory way. Participants will receive manipulatives used in the workshop.

 

Breakout 14 - Linda Farrell **

Using Decodable and Leveled Readers Appropriately

The session starts with a quick review of the differences between decodable books and leveled readers. This session helps teachers think about the ways to use leveled readers and decodable readers for maximum instructional benefit. Leveled readers are for exposure to high frequency words and as a vehicle for oral discussion about stories’ topics. By reading the books to the students or having students echo read with the teacher, none of the guessing strategies needs to be used by the students and the books can still be used for finding high frequency words and as a basis for building background knowledge and discussion skills. The focus with decodable books can be accurate reading, with one or two questions about literal understanding of the story. The question of when students are ready to read leveled readers on their own will be addressed. Most students are ready for independent reading of non-decodable books when they can: 1) accurately read real and nonsense CVC and silent e words in isolation, 2) accurately read two syllable words with closed syllables, and 3) read a decodable passage with those types of words with 98% accuracy and with a rate at or near the benchmark for the student’s grade level. **

 

Breakout 15 - Sharron Plante

Enhancing Structured Literacy Instruction with Educational Technology 

For students with dyslexia, systematic multi-sensory linguistic instruction following the Orton-Gillingham approach has been shown in research to be the most effective for remediation. While the OG approach has traditionally been 1-1 model, the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners has embraced a Classroom Educator model, in the hopes of providing more educators with the tools to provide a greater number of dyslexic students with effective instruction. The challenge becomes how to best provide that instruction in a small group environment. 

The utilization of technology (Smartboards, iPads, apps and websites) can make the OG classroom instruction a multi-sensory process that is engaging while maintaining the essence of what makes the OG approach so beneficial for dyslexic students. A Classroom Educator, Certified Director of Technology from The Southport School will share how to include technology as an instructive and assistive tool following the traditional OG approach in the small classroom setting. 

 

Breakout 16 - Donell Pons

Suffering in Silence: No Child or Adult Left Behind

When students are allowed to advance from grade to grade without making important reading milestones, it sets them up for continued academic struggles. If left unaddressed, students leave the education system with reading and writing skills far below what they need in order to make important choices about their future vocations. Learn how parents can recognize reading difficulties in both younger and older students and what to do about it.

 

Parent Track Session 4

Karee Atkinson, Lindsey Kemeny, Elisa Aten and Phoebe Beacham 

Parent Panel Q&A

Parents of students with dyslexia will answer your questions and share advice and lessons learned. 

 

10:50am 11:30am

Workshop 1: Decoding Dyslexia Utah

Dyslexia Simulation- Amy Sandgren

Have you ever wondered what is feels like to be a student with dyslexia in the classroom? This simulation experience will provide a small taste of some of the challenges students with dyslexia face daily. 

 

Workshop 2: Reading Horizons

Implementing Tier 1 Phonics Instruction: Utah Educators Share Results Stacy Hurst

A group of Utah educators from different schools will share their experience implementing phonics instruction in Tier 1 classrooms. These teachers, instructional coaches, and administrators will share student success stories and test data to describe the impact Tier 1 phonics instruction has had on the reading development of all students. 

Workshop 3: University of Utah Reading Clinic

IEP Essentials: Paula Kashiwaeda & Karen Harrop, Ed.S.

This co-presented interactive session will guide parents & educators through the special education process from the initial step of a request for a special education evaluation, to the implementation of an Individualized Education Program (if eligible), and all the steps in between.

 

Workshop 4: Decoding Dyslexia Utah

Utah State Board of Education Dyslexia Handbook Overview- Donell Pons

Join one of the members of the USBE appointed Utah State Dyslexia Task Force that created the Utah State Dyslexia Handbook to discuss key points and commonly asked questions about dyslexia in schools. Bring your copy of the handbook that you received at registration to flag important sections during this discussion. 

 

Workshop 5:Voyager Soporius Linda Hafen

What Does Science Say About Teaching Reading? How does LETRS help?

According to Dr. Louisa Moats, research shows that 95 percent of first-grade

students can be taught to read. “Teaching reading is complex and challenging, and most teachers benefit enormously from learning what we teach in LETRS.” LETRS provides educators with the background, depth of knowledge, and tools to teach language and literacy skills to every student regardless of the literacy program in use.

 

Workshop 6: 95% Group**

Phonemic Awareness for Older Students- Karen Kemp

Multiple researchers have concluded that as many as one out of every ten adolescents has serious difficulties in identifying words, a problem that often stems from a phonological awareness deficit. And, because most universal screening tools do not assess beyond phoneme segmentation, phonemic awareness instruction often stops once students are able to successfully segment single-syllable words. As a result, once students move beyond kindergarten and early first grade, phonemic awareness issues tend to fall under the radar. This practice is often an underlying factor in the lack of response to intervention for older students: a deficit in higher-level phoneme analysis skills is restricting their growth in word-reading skills. Unless this deficit is resolved, accurate, fluent decoding and comprehension will continue to be elusive. The key for these students is to provide phoneme analysis instruction. During this interactive and engaging session, participants will be engaged in responding to advanced phoneme analysis tasks, will practice those tasks, and plan for the use of these strategies with groups of students in grades two and beyond. Participants will leave with strategies for integrating phoneme analysis within their word level instruction.**

 

11:35-12:15pm

Workshop 7: Decoding Dyslexia Utah**

VOWELS RULE: Kathy Tenney

The Long and Short on Vowels, and much more!  This hands-on, interactive workshop will teach attendees how to identify vowel sounds, code vowels for reading, and count syllables. The six syllable types will be presented with multisensory ways to practice each type. Participants will learn about breves, macrons, diphthongs, digraphs, reading with “c” and “g,” and final stable syllables.  It’s all about vowels! Includes a make and take project, tricks, treats, and additional resources you can use THIS WEEK in your classroom or home.**  

 

Workshop 8: Reading Horizons

Reading Horizons: A Solution for Every Student: Stacy Hurst

Reading Horizons is a Structured Literacy program that provides explicit and systematic instruction of the specific components of language that serve as a foundation for reading, spelling, and writing.  The Reading Horizons method has been successfully used with beginning readers to prevent reading difficulties and with struggling readers of all ages to successfully intervene when necessary. Come and learn more about Reading Horizons! 

 

Workshop 9: Decoding Dyslexia Utah 

Assistive Technology Demos - DDUT Youth Advocates

The DD-UT Youth Advocates will tell you the reasons assistive technology helps them keep up with their peers and will provide demonstrations of some of their favorite assistive technology tools.

 

Workshop 10: University of Utah Reading Clinic (repeat of workshop 3)

IEP Essentials: Paula Kashiwaeda & Karen Harrop, Ed.S.

This co-presented interactive session will guide parents & educators through the special education process from the initial step of a request for a special education evaluation, to the implementation of an Individualized Education Program (if eligible), and all the steps in between.

 

Workshop 11: Math for Middles

How Dyslexia Affects Math: Adrianne Mildrum & Heather Brand

You're passionate about helping your child or student with dyslexia but have you ever thought about how it affects other subject areas? Dyslexia is a different way of thinking that doesn't just affect reading. In this session, you'll learn how dyslexia impacts a students ability to reason mathematically, perform procedural steps, and remember math facts. See how what you know about teaching reading can be applied to helping your students gain confidence in math.

 

Workshop 12: Neuhaus Education

“I’m Done”: Tackling Revision Beyond Editing-Barbra Conway

In this session, participants will practice strategies that can be used with reluctant paragraph and essay writers to break down the process of revision to bring voice, color, and depth to their own writing. In a series of model lessons, we will practice drawing the elements that good writers use such as word choice, figurative language, tone, and sentence variation, and apply these same elements to our own

writing during the process of revision. Each model lesson contains the following segments:

When I Read: This draws students’ attention to good examples in literature and informational text.

When I Write: A model for students explains the focus of the lesson.

Your Turn: This is a short practice activity to reinforce the element.

Debrief: Students reflect on changes they made and the effect of the changes.

Revise and Apply: Students are encouraged to apply the new revision strategy to their own writing.

These lessons can serve as models for teachers to create their own lessons that encourage the recursive writing process for young writers who say, “I’m done!”

 

Day 2 Lunch Keynotes 1:15-1:35pm

Decoding Dyslexia Utah Youth Advocates- Utah youth ages 12-18 will share their stories and experiences as students with dyslexia in Utah Schools. 

1:35-2:15 pm Karee Atkinson 

Hiding in Plain Sight: My Journey Through Utah’s Education System as a Student with Dyslexia

 

2:20-3:30pm

Breakout 17 - Nancy Coffman (Repeat of Breakout 13)

Spelling: Who knew there were rules?!

This interactive presentation will guide participants in discovering and practicing the rules for spelling base words. Predictable patterns of our language will be explored in a multisensory way. Participants will receive manipulatives used in the workshop.

 

Breakout 18 -Linda Farrell**

Focused Oral Reading Practice: A New Approach to Fluency Instruction

Fluency programs are often considered the “solution” for struggling readers. This interactive session examines underlying skills necessary for fluent reading along with three critical parts of fluency: accuracy, rate, and prosody. It provides a simple research-based framework for determining which students need fluency, developing instruction to meet individual needs, and assessing growth. The new method includes focusing on accuracy before turning to rate. It also is effective at getting students to read with appropriate accuracy and rate the first time they attempt a passage. Participants receive tracking charts based on the three-part framework for fluency instruction.**

 

Breakout19 - Sharron Plante (repeat of Breakout 15)

Enhancing Structured Literacy Instruction with Educational Technology 

For students with dyslexia, systematic multi-sensory linguistic instruction following the Orton-Gillingham approach has been shown in research to be the most effective for remediation. While the OG approach has traditionally been 1-1 model, the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners has embraced a Classroom Educator model, in the hopes of providing more educators with the tools to provide a greater number of dyslexic students with effective instruction. The challenge becomes how to best provide that instruction in a small group environment. 

The utilization of technology (Smartboards, iPads, apps and websites) can make the OG classroom instruction a multi-sensory process that is engaging while maintaining the essence of what makes the OG approach so beneficial for dyslexic students. A Classroom Educator, Director of Technology from The Southport School will share how to include technology as an instructive and assistive tool following the traditional OG approach in the small classroom setting. 

 

Breakout 20 - Barbara Wirostko MD

The Vision Myths of Dyslexia

This session will cover the basic understanding and anatomy of the ocular system and the visual pathways as they relate to naming and reading. Background and an overview will be given on the role for vision therapy, the myths and truths, as well as the role for colored lens “Irlens” to decrease visual overload and help with visual processing. The audience will walk away with a better understanding on when to refer a student for an eye exam and how certain therapies may help IF indicated.  A review of what is known to date on how images are processed from when they first enter the eye on the retina followed by being processed in the brain; temporal/parietal, and occipital "vision" lobes. A review of what are considered healthy eye movements as well as how the eyes work to “track” images and read. 

 

Parent Track Session 5: Michelle Searl 

The Collaborative IEP: Your Right to Parent Involvement

**sessions marked with ** will be live-streamed & recorded for our virtual conference.

© 2023 by Name of Site. Proudly created with Wix.com